[[ Free Epub ]] ↯ Complete Poems and Selected Letters ⇮ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

And so she comes to dream herself the tree, the wind possessing her, weaving her young veins, holding her to the sky and its quick blue, drowning the fever of her hands in sunlight She has no memory, nor fear, nor hope beyond the grass and shadows at her feet To be completely honest, I d never heard of this poet until about a week ago A lot of his poetry is so beautiful, but I didn t care much for the letters etc that followed the poetry Still, he s worth checking out3.5 stars [[ Free Epub ]] ☇ Complete Poems and Selected Letters ⇔ No American Poet Has So Swiftly And Decisively Transformed The Course Of Poetry As Hart Crane In His Haunted, Brief Life, Crane Fashioned A Distinctively Modern Idiom That Fused The Ornate Rhetoric Of The Elizabethans, The Ecstatic Enigmas Of Rimbaud, And The Prophetic Utterances And Cosmic Sympathy Of Whitman, In A Quest For Wholeness And Healing In What He Called The Broken World White Buildings, Perhaps The Greatest Debut Volume In American Poetry Since Leaves Of Grass, Is But An Exquisite Prelude To Crane S Masterpiece The Bridge, His Magnificent Evocation Of America From Columbus To The Jazz Age That Countered The Pessimism Of Eliot S The Waste Land And Became A Crucial Influence On Poets Whose Impact Continues To This Day This Edition Is The Largest Collection Of Crane S Writings Ever Published Gathered Here Are The Complete Poems And Published Prose, Along With A Generous Selection Of Crane S Letters, Several Of Which Have Never Before Been Published In His Letters Crane Elucidates His Aims As An Artist And Provides Fascinating Glosses On His Poetry His Voluminous Correspondence Also Offers An Intriguing Glimpse Into His Complicated Personality, As Well As His Tempestuous Relationships With Family, Lovers, And Writers Such As Allen Tate, Waldo Frank, Yvor Winters, Jean Toomer, Marianne Moore, E E Cummings, William Carlos Williams, And Katherine Anne Porter Several Letters Included Here Are Published For The First Time This Landmark Page Volume Features A Detailed And Freshly Researched Chronology Of Crane S Life By Editor Langdon Hammer, Chair Of The English Department At Yale University And A Biographer Of Crane, As Well As Extensive Explanatory Notes, And Over Fifty Biographical Sketches Of Crane S Correspondents Crane has an esoteric and idiosyncratic style that combatively resists paraphrase His word collages connote, imply, suggest but rarely tell As Crane wrote to Harriet Monroe A s a poet, I may very possibly be interested in the so called illogical impingements of the connotations of words on the consciousness and their combinations and interplay in metaphor on this basis than I am interested in the preservation of their logically rigid significations at the cost of limiting my subject matter and the perceptions involved in the poem This approach creates at times a rough yet musical verse, reminding me a Gerard Manley Hopkins in that he piles word on word in jagged rhythms The word play is notable and, at its best, oddly beautiful without being affectatious But this is a difficult to successfully maintain, and one is always walking the tightrope risking going so far he or she loses the reader.Although Crane argued for the democratic nature of his style we re all capable of feeling the connotations of words his work is often than not obscure and esoteric For me, the language holds together for a while but the connotations metaphors eventually become so varied and stretched so far that the idea feeling loses the center of gravity holding it together and it disintegrates into a word salad In the end, most of his poetry becomes a secret language that needs to be decoded and unpacked by literary types a la The Waste Land and The Cantos and Ulysses All good writing and poetry have their so called illogical impingements But they also have straightforward telling I won t say meaning It s possible to have both The question is how much of either you want as a writer or reader Crane, for me, goes too far for me to consider his poems successful The Bridge In about 40 pages, Crane tries to capture the genius of America and retell the history of the continent He certainly has ambition He doesn t succeed The theme is diffuse, and if the theme were not tenuous enough, the language unravels and it all falls rather flat The center is missing Is this the journey of one person Or a nation Maybe it s both Whichever way you choose to read this, the haphazard structure, capricious episodes and overwrought language supports neither It needs to be either much longer or much shorter.While it seems that Crane agrees with most of early twentieth century Modern poets that Western Civilization was a sterile, debauched mess, he professes to be optimistic that some kind of epiphany is possible Strangely, he cites Whitman Whitman loved the loud chugging of a factory city, the varieties of people, the common lot, democracy and even the suffering of the people He needed no complicated myth fantasy to unravel the spirituality of the world He looked around He saw and accepted the good and the bad of the world equally Crane seems to miss that entirely.This poem frustrated me in so many ways The connotative language doesn t hold together As noted above, it simply breaks apart into a word salad in many places I don t like the way he suddenly drops into 16th century thee and thou It just seems out of place and capricious in use I m not comfortable with his portrayal of women, African Americans or Native Americans In his strange attempts to idealize them, it seems to me he demeans their real strengths and complexities I find the idealization of Native American culture as some kind of Edenic natural paradise also rather annoying and clich d Again, this over simplified fantasy betrays the depths and varieties of the pre Columbus Native American cultures.His unusual, overwrought, connotative language does create some beautiful lines Blind fists of nothing, humpty dumpty clods p 42 no idea what this means And few evade full measure of their fate 44 Taut motors surge, space gnawing, into flight 48 describing the Wright Brothers first flight It also produces some baffling phrases rumorous nights 43 in time s despite 44 catch the trout s moon whisper 46 clusterous sheen 59 occult snows 59 I read The Bridge years ago, and it left me cold I thought maybe I missed something so I read it again I hadn t missed anything Crane said this would be either a great success or a great failure Its failure is great and I mean that as a compliment This is not a great failure of fear, it is a fearless failure I give him a lot of credit for that. What made Hart Crane an enormous poet was not a massive output of lines he published only two volumes of poetry in his terribly short life , but rather it was his ability to fuse the dilemmas of modern man with a superbly stylized classical approach Though his work was often thematically similar to that of American modernist poets like Eliot, Pound, Williams, etc., he set himself apart from these contemporaries through his superior facility for metrical and lyrical grace Where countless modernists of the 1920 s would often deal in obscure imagery seemingly only for obscurity s sake, one always has the sense with Crane that his aims were rigidly defined On the other hand, his poems were never axiomatic in nature, prudently shunning truisms and continuously indicating that which is indisputable through the use of solicitous metaphor.Crane was a devoted letter writer, and often sought to explicate his intentions when their purpose or execution was questioned Many artists throughout history have grown belligerent at the first sign that their labor is being scrutinized, or even analyzed Crane, however, would respond cogently to any detractor, not so much in an effort to vindicate his own work, but to defend the very form of poetry itself Said Crane, I know that I run the risk of much criticism by defending such theories as I have, but as it is part of a poet s business to risk not only criticism but folly in the conquest of consciousness I can only say that I attach no intrinsic value to what means I use beyond their practical service in giving form to the living stuff of the imagination. Caveat lector most of these letters just suck They range from soused trivial logorrhea to careful epistles designed to impress his biographers you should back slowly away when the letter is addressed to Yvor Winters Sure, Hart Crane offed himself early, but Keats he ain t The one astonishing exception is his letter to Aunt Harriet Monroe editor of Poetry where he explicates At Melville s Tomb for her tinny Edwardian ears This is a rare example of a confident verse spinner convincingly attacking an editor for accusing them of being for lack of a better term a wank artist I should also mention that Crane s Unpublished Poems Fragments collected here are fascinating, but often a teensy bit embarrassing For example, a poem called What Nots begins as follows What is a What Not if what is not negates what is not what you though it was Many others are worse.Still, his unpublished, fragmentary attempt to mock e.e cummings OF AN EVENING PULLING OFF A LITTLE EXPERIENCE it s called is worth a read while blundering fumbiguts gather accu rate little, O SO masturbations in to fractions of heaven Hold tight bless worms trilling rimple flock to sad iron The published poems are here too, and they shall ignite you Five stars for those. In the book HEART CRANE, a collection of poems of selected letters, the language and word choice bring tremendous strength to the writing Each of the poems incorporate many of the same themes, each poem is balanced both with imagery and setting, describing the scene to it fullest The writing also makes a unique balance of the images of spirituality as well as the physical world we live in At times the writing combines spirituality and Physical life forming almost a divine image in the readers mind I can highly recommend this collection to readers of poetry as well as spiritual poetry Many of the images enhanced through the writing are motivating as well as inspirational.This book is a calming and soothing book to any reader who wants to relax or find a place of peace away from their everyday lives. I read this just for Key West, Crane s unreleased book, and some of the other uncollected poems Five stars for The Bridge, White Buildings, and Key West, the quality of the rest varies widely Still this is a must for Crane die hards like me who have only been able to get their hands on the two major books released during his lifetime I m going to leave this in the currently reading list, even though I put it on the street a few months ago, half read I gave up I ll finish it if it turns up again of if it seems to be really mysteriously important for me to finish it. Here are housed finished monuments lasting than bronze and loftier than the pyramid s royal pile No furious north wind an knock these down. A comprehensive volume of one of the greatest American poets of the 20th century.